INDIA DESIGN ID 2024: FEB 7-12, 2024, NSIC GROUNDS, OKHLA, NEW DELHI
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INDIA DESIGN ID 2024 | 15-18 FEB, 2024 | NSIC GROUNDS, OKHLA, NEW DELHI

Home > The House of Curves by Logic Architecture + Research

The House of Curves by Logic Architecture + Research

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Fact File
Location: Gurugram
Size: 220 sq m
Principal Architect: Anuj Kapoor
Photography by: Suryan and Dang

 

Called The House of Curves, this contemporary Gurugram residence is envisioned as a poised space by Anuj Kapoor-led design firm Logic Architecture + Research. Standing on a 200-square-metre area, this abode is a remodelled 3+1 residential configuration catering to a three-generational family. Each bedroom is designed with the distinct personalities of its occupants in mind. For example, the kids’ room reflects a lively earthy colour scheme, while the master suite exhibits an opulent, timeless material palette.

The design process was heavily dependent on understanding what each resident fancied for the different spaces in the home, to enable collective bliss within the domestic space. It was about three iterations and multiple to-and-fros with the client(s) later, that the final solution was arrived upon, striking a balance between the residents’ whims and the designers’ aspirations for the home.

 

To enable a coherent dialogue between spaces, the design process emphasised integrating unifying design elements and vocabulary to lend seamlessness to interiors representing the family’s shared ethos.

Inundated with natural light and breeze, the interior architecture stands out with its arched doors, vivid hues, and sustainable and low-maintenance material palette comprising wood, terracotta, natural stone, lime plaster, and concrete, paired with sweeping curves and bespoke furnishings. In keeping with a sustainable approach, the design solutions included repurposing waste into décor like clocks, handles, and other accents.

Conforming to traditional practises, the eldest member in the family was not entirely in favour of an open kitchen layout.

Consequently, a functionally segregated kitchen features two zones: dry (for working) and wet (for washing), paired with a dining area to embrace the natural light within these spaces.

Opening up and connecting the kitchen-dining area, further made room for natural light to enter and spread beautifully across spaces.  It was necessary to modify the original 4-BHK plan into a 3+1 configuration to include two large master bathrooms, a kid’s room, and a multipurpose study area. The initial brief also suggested a special emphasis on the home being open, airy and spacious with loads of storage. The client wanted a colour-rich, lit, bright home (quite literally).

 

Sprawling on a monolithic micro-concrete floor, the living room exhibits a design dominated by two bold hues—green and blue. Complementing the muted aesthetics that transition seamlessly into the central passageway representative of the identity of this home, evoking the notion of playfulness and harmony. Expanding on their concept, the designers state, “This home aspires for collective bliss amidst relationships—both human and spatial.”

 

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