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indiadesignid / July 18, 2020

Paddock by Humming Tree

Paddock by Humming Tree is a sustainably fashioned car showroom and workshop (Pete’s Automotive Products Pvt Ltd) in Kerala. Apart from the witty wordplay in the name, it was the genuinely distinct design approach that fascinated us. Crafted from a raw material palette that primarily constitutes reused 80-year-old laterite stone contrasted with geometric forms and black metal detailing, the space is replete with climate and environment-responsive components. Swapping air conditioning systems for louvered and chimney-style natural ventilation, employing ground source pumps to recycle rainwater, energy-saving lighting solutions and solar power are some of the sustainable features of this tastefully created space. Scroll down to read more.

One floor of the 3800 sq ft space has been dedicated entirely to displaying cars, while the other accommodates the manager’s cabin and back office. Lime plaster was selected as a contextual response that not only complemented the designers’ desired aesthetic, but also enhanced the strength and economic efficiency of the structure. Subtle alterations in the visual hardness of the materials ensure that the black metal straight flight works harmoniously to create texture and contrast.

A unique take on the banality of most contemporary glass and metal car showrooms, Paddock features architectural detailing that resonates with the automotive theme. A wooden geometric reception table is offset by the double height, whitewashed exposed brick wall, while the triangular flexi-light ceiling breaks the visual uniformity of the rectangular chamber.

Low level ventilation louvers around the edge of the showroom, along with chimney-style ventilation terminals mounted on the roof ensure that wind pressure draws air through the showroom, up through the roof terminals through the ‘stack effect’—thereby cooling the showroom with no harmful emissions. Apart from the absence of noisy machinery and the facilitated circulation of fresh air and natural light, rainwater has been recycled using ground source pumps. 68 % Natural & low-wattage luminaries (both fluorescent and compact fluorescent lamps) have also been widely utilised. Standard high base 400-watt lamps have been replaced with four 54-watt lamps, providing the same amount of light, but using less energy. Occupancy sensors have been installed and automatically turn off the lights in their area after a few minutes of no movement detection.

 

Photographs by Justin Sebastian

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